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Tyrone is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the south-west shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,155 km² and has a population of about 177,986, with its county town being Omagh. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland and is within the historic province of Ulster.

Tyrone is the seventh largest of Ireland’s thirty-two counties by area and tenth largest by population. It is the second largest of Ulster’s nine counties by area and fourth largest by population. The county is no longer used as an administrative division for local government purposes, but retains a strong identity in popular culture.

Historically Tyrone stretched as far north as Lough Foyle, and comprised part of modern day County Londonderry east of the River Foyle. The majority of County Londonderry was carved out of Tyrone between 1610–1620 when that land went to the Guilds of London to set up profit making schemes based on natural resources located there. Tyrone was the traditional stronghold of the various O’Neill clans and families, the strongest of the Gaelic Irish families in Ulster, surviving into the seventeenth century. The ancient principality of Tír Eoghain, the inheritance of the O’Neills, included the whole of the present counties of Tyrone and Londonderry, and the four baronies of West Inishowen, East Inishowen, RaphoeNorth and Raphoe South in County Donegal.